Counseling

The Presentation High School Counseling Department is committed to helping students create and maintain a well-balanced curricular and co-curricular profile that allows them to reach their goals both academically and personally.

There are several counseling programs available on campus, including personal counseling, academic monitoring, peer tutoring, mentoring, college counseling, career counseling and Parent Counseling Information Nights.

Each class level is assigned to a personal counselor with master's-level training. The counselor remains with that class level in order to facilitate a strong long-term counseling relationship with students. Counselors initiate appointments with each student on their caseload a minimum of once per semester in grades 9-12.

Counselors are available to students each day as needed. Counselors maintain contact with parents when appropriate and are also available to mentors and all other faculty members who have concerns about individual students.

Articles and Updates

The Importance of Sleep and the Lack Thereof

by MaryLynne Rodriguez

While I struggled with the title of this particular article, I chose to leave it intact as it captures the essence of what I'm hearing from our students. We've all heard that the average growing human should get an average of 8-10 hours of sleep each day, according to Judith Owens, a top pediatric researcher on sleep. And to many of you, that goal seems unattainable. However, this is one battle I am going to continue to approach with the students I see as their Class Level Counselor.

The conversation typically begins simply enough, “what time do you typically get to bed each evening?”  From there, responses can vary, from knowing smiles to blank stares. On average, many students I have met with make their bedtime a priority with more than I had expected to say “10:30-11:00 p.m.” However, there are some students whose sleep habits are concerning, often leading to no more than 4-5 hours per night. Some of the unhealthy sleep habits are contributing to unhealthy coping mechanisms when it comes to dealing with their academics and everyday stressors facing teens today. Often, teens feel that this negative cycle cannot be changed and that they have no sense of control in developing better sleep habits.

Too much homework = less sleep. I have found that this is not necessarily the case and that there are multiple factors at play. From the obvious tech obsessions with social media and Netflix/YouTube to the multitude of activities our students involve themselves in, there is more contributing to unhealthy sleep schedule beyond homework. The feeling that you need to do it all to get into “Best College A” is simply incorrect. I will leave it to my esteemed colleagues in College Counseling to work with your students on rewriting their narratives regarding this common misconception.

According to William Stixrud and Ned Johnson, “without sleep, a vicious cycle takes place. Sleep deprivation is a form of chronic stress, can trigger anxiety and mood disorders in children who are already vulnerable to getting them, has physical implications, and has an impact on emotional control which is dramatically impaired.” Is it a wonder that this negative cycle poses as a “no way out” scenario for our students?

What can we do?

Chipping away at this issue that several of my students face begins with identifying what control they have over the matter. I recommend creating an evening routine with your daughter. Begin by listing out the activities after school hours she participates in, as well as the average number of minutes/hours it takes to complete each of her courses’ homework assignments. From there, scheduling in a similar time each evening to begin a bedtime routine is essential.

Click here for Tips for Making & Following a Study Schedule

It may take a few weeks to train the body to tire by 11:00 p.m. every evening if she is accustomed to staying awake until midnight, so there are a few items at no cost to inexpensive that you can use as sleep aides to establish a nightly routine she will look forward to, some ideas include:  

Holiday breaks are a wonderful time to reset the internal clock, get caught up on long-term assignments, and identify priorities for the upcoming semester. Completing homework the day it is assigned is key in students that can maintain a healthy bedtime. The pressure of completing an assignment or studying for a test the night before is no longer present if their time is managed correctly. I fully recognize that the student is the source of change, and no matter what amount of support you provide to her in maintaining a schedule, as a young adult, she has to be willing to make the change herself. While we cannot control the outside pressures teens face today; we can help them identify ways to take back their control and feel empowered by the way they choose to spend and schedule their time.

Vaping

by Nancy Taylor and MaryLynne Rodriguez

Vaping among teens has taken center stage in national media and here at Presentation we are no exception.  We are aware that there are Pres students who are vaping - and more concerning, we are aware that they are vaping on campus - in the bathrooms, locker rooms and even in the classrooms.  This is concerning on several levels - most specifically for our student’s health and development.

While we are aware this is not an issue unique to Presentation High School, we have been in conversation with other local area high schools regarding the uptick in student reports that this is occurring during the school day. “Nearly a third of 13-to-18-year-olds who responded to a separate survey conducted by The Wall Street Journal with research firm Mercury Analytics said they currently vape.

Click here for the Wall Street Journal article, Youth Vaping Has Soared in 2018

What Can Parents Do?

According to Partnership for Drug Free Kids, make it clear to your daughter that you don’t approve of them vaping or using e-cigarettes, no matter what.

If you think your daughter is vaping, take a deep breath and set yourself up for success by creating a safe, open and comfortable space to start talking with your son or daughter. As angry or frustrated as you feel, keep reminding yourself to speak and listen from a place of love, support and concern. Explain to them that young people who use THC or nicotine products in any form, including e-cigarettes or vaporizers, are uniquely at risk for long-lasting effects. Because these substances affect the development of the brain’s reward system, continued use can lead to addiction (the likelihood of addiction increases considerably for those who start young), as well as other health problems. You want your child to be as healthy as possible. Find out why vaping might be attractive to your son or daughter, and work with him or her to replace it with a healthier behavior.”

Click here to for the article, Teen Vaping Trend - What Parents Need to Know

While we understand it may be difficult to imagine your daughter partaking in such an risky activity, the conversation is still important to have, as she most likely will be in contact with a peer whether it be in high school or college that will be vaping. Please refer to this helpful tip sheet by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to assist you in preparing for a conversation with your daughter, and provide you with factual information to reinforce your concerns.

Click here for the brochure, Talk with Your Teens About E-cigarettes: a Tip Sheet for Parents